• Home
  • National Safety Month, Week 2: Recharge to be in Charge (Focusing on Fatigue)

National Safety Month, Week 2: Recharge to be in Charge (Focusing on Fatigue)

Monday, June 5, 2017

Safety Check: Recharge to be in Charge

Like many Americans, you might feel that you’re not getting enough sleep. The CDC reports that 1 in 3 adults don’t

get enough sleep. It is also estimated that 37 percent of the U.S. workforce is sleep deprived. We need proper sleep to

recharge our stamina, face the day and avoid injuries at home and at work.

Getting Good Sleep

To be alert, well-rested and at your best, follow these tips:

  • Get 7-9 hours of sleep every day
  • Create and follow a sleep schedule. Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day—even on weekends.
  • Eliminate unnecessary light
  • Keep your bedroom temperate – neither hot nor cold
  • Make sure your bed and pillows are comfortable and support restful sleep
  • Avoid eating right before bed
  • Remember that bedtime is for sleeping, not reading or watching TV
  • Avoid using electronic devices before bed which can inhibit sleep

Dangers of Sleep Deprivation

We all have busy lives and sleep is often the first thing many of us cut back on to accommodate our schedules. In the long run, this can be dangerous. Sleep deprivation has been shown to raise the risks of depression, obesity and heart disease, and has an adverse effect on reproductive health. Lack of sleep can also lead you to experience short bursts of sleep lasting anywhere from a fraction of a second or up to 30 seconds, known as microsleep. Individuals who experience microsleep lose awareness and consciousness during the episode, which can be dangerous especially on the road.

  • Plan to take regular rest breaks and rotate drivers when travelling long distances
  • Avoid alcohol and medications that may make you drowsy while driving
  • If you feel drowsy, pull over when it is safe to do so
  • To combat drowsiness, have a cup of coffee or caffeinated drink and stretch your legs by taking a short walk
  • If you need more rest, take a quick nap if it is safe to do so
  • If you are too tired to continue driving even after a break, don’t drive. Stay at a hotel or call someone—a loved one, friend or even a cab or ride-sharing service—to get you to your destination safely

Don’t get sidelined by fatigue. Get plenty of sleep to recharge and stay healthy and avoid dangerous situations like driving when drowsy.

Tip Sheet: English & Spanish

Related articles:

Fatigue and Worker Safety

Study Explores Which Jobs Have a Higher Percentage of Sleep-deprived Workers

 

Other National Safety Month stories:

Week 1: Stand Up to Falls



Report A Safety Concern

Report a concern to KU-EHS

KU Today
One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
44 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times